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DSC_0050 Zach Doty AS PostgreSQL Statement Cover Photo

JOINS Foundations: The AS PostgreSQL Statement

Intro to JOINS: the AS PostgreSQL Statement

What’s up SQL people? We’re back, and better than ever, in our foray to learn PostgreSQL. Since we’ve completed some intermediate skills challenges & learned GROUP BY, it’s time to examine JOINS.

Before we examine JOINS, there’s a key foundation piece we must cover first: the AS statement in PostgreSQL. Let’s jump in.

 

About the AS Statement

The AS statement in PostgreSQL enables us to rename sections of a table or table columns with a temporary alias, or almost a variable, for manipulation.

It’s a simple statement, so let’s see it in action.

 

1. Basic AS Statement Example

Our most basic example is a basic query where perhaps a column wasn’t named to our liking. Consider the following.

SELECT rental_rate AS film_cost

FROM film

LIMIT 10;

2017-08-30-001-AS-Statement-Syntax-Example-1

Great for an introductory example, but not inherently useful. Read on as we apply the AS statement more deeply.

2. Semi-Intermediate AS Statement Example

Let’s provide an example that’s a bit more engaged. Example, if we use aggregate functions, the column output doesn’t have a clean name attached to it. But no longer! The AS statement allows us to have the summation output in a GROUP BY statement to something we’ll recognize.

 

SELECT customer_id, SUM(amount) AS customer_ltv

FROM payment

GROUP BY customer_id

ORDER BY customer_ltv DESC

LIMIT 7;

2017-08-30-002-AS-Statement-Syntax-aggregate-example-2

 

This is something more useful for intermediate PostgreSQL work!

 

Wrap Up

We aren’t spending much further time here since this is a simple application and the JOINS statement is the function we’re truly after. If you’re just joining this series, check out our home page on how to learn PostgreSQL.

DSC_0012 Zach Doty PostgreSQL cover photo

PostgreSQL Intermediate Skills Test

Hey there, SQL-ites. Time for another (yes, another!) PostgreSQL skills challenge. It’s our last stop before moving into more intermediate and advanced PostgreSQL skills, such as JOINS.

If you’re just joining this series on SQL, we previously covered the HAVING statement & GROUP BY. Here’s the home page of our journey in learning PostgreSQL. Today, we do a more rounded knowledge check of older PostgreSQL statements, such as SELECT WHERE, COUNT & ORDER BY.

We have 3 problems, and provide the winning code for each, based on our sample database. In the past, I’ve given more explanation to the problems, but because I’m trying to get some traction myself in moving forward, we’ll only have problem & solution laid out here.

Alright, let’s go!

1. Return the customer IDs of customers who have spent at least $110 with the staff member who has an ID of 2.

The answer should be customers 187 and 148.

SELECT customer_id, SUM(amount)
FROM payment
WHERE staff_id=2
GROUP BY customer_id
HAVING SUM(amount) >110;

 

2. How many films begin with the letter J?

The answer should be 20.

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM film

WHERE title LIKE ‘J%’;

 

3. What customer has the highest customer ID number whose name starts with an ‘E’ and has an address ID lower than 500?

The answer is Eddie Tomlin.

SELECT customer_id, first_name, last_name, address_id
FROM customer
WHERE address_id <500 AND first_name LIKE ‘E%’
ORDER BY customer_id DESC;

 

We’ll see you on the other side soon, for some JOINS awesomeness. 🙂

DSC_0511 Zach Doty Cover Photo Univariate Linear Regression

Univariate Linear Regression Concepts

Howdy, machine learning compatriots! Welcome back to our foray into getting started with machine learning. Previously, we covered some core machine learning concepts, namely supervised machine learning algorithms and unsupervised / deep learning. (For the full series to date, here’s our Machine Learning for Beginners page.)

 

Today we’re learning the concepts behind supervised machine learning algorithms. Specifically, we examine univariate (one variable) linear regression. Univariate linear regression is the beginner’s playpen in supervised machine learning problems. We endeavor to understand the “footwork” behind the flashy name, without going too far into the linear algebra weeds.

 

Quick Recap: Supervised Machine Learning Problems

If you’re just dropping into the series, we’ll quickly set today’s stage. Univariate linear regression falls under the category of regression algorithms, withing supervised learning machine learning problems.

 

2017-04-30-001-Machine-Learning-Algorithm-Types

  • Supervised learning: we provide the algorithm with pre-cleaned, pre-labeled data. The algorithm learns off the data we provide to classify or predict new data.
  • Regression: making a line of best fit.

 

When we first covered supervised machine learning concepts, regression was shown to make a line of best fit from existing data, so we could predict new data points. Below, we first used the example of an SEO team predicting how many unique linking domains a page would need to achieve a certain rank. (A supervised learning problem, using a regression algorithm for future predictions.)

 

2017-04-11-002-Regression-Problem-Linear-Quadratic-Comp

Important note: our graphic above is similar to linear, but is not quite, linear regression. Details, details. At any rate, this should take us in nicely to examining the inner workings of univariate linear regression.

 

A High Level Look at the Regression Problem Process

If I’m being brutally honest, the process of translating machine learning education to public-facing blog posts has been my toughest effort to date. In other words, I try to make my posts easy to follow, like dummy notes I’m taking as I learn.

That being said, 2 weeks into a machine learning course, and the content has already gone off the wheels, deep into linear algebra and so forth. So, instead of going into the weeds for publication, I’m trying to keep it snackable (buzzword bingo, drink!) and down to earth.

Let’s settle in slowly on the regression problem process. Also illustrated below, we need a few key steps:

  1. A cleaned training data set with correct labels
  2. A program (such as Matlab or Octave) with functionality and access to an appropriate univariate linear regression algorithm
  3. A hypothesis and prediction of new values

2017-04-30-002-Univariate-Machine-Learning-Regression-Process

 

Let’s peel back a layer and go slightly deeper. Since cleaning and correctly labeling training data is largely dependent on you & your domain, we’re skipping that step. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

 

Instead, let’s look closer at the algorithm & hypothesis portions! Our first stop is something called the cost function.

 

The Cost Function in Linear Regression Learning Problems: Squared Error

Before we jump into cost function, let’s turn over a new leaf in visual examples. Instead of our SEO example, let’s look at a problem that could be more linear-friendly. Below, let’s assume we have some data on a customer’s lifetime value plotted against the number of marketing touchpoints they’ve interacted with.

2017-04-30-003a-Univariate-Linear-Regression-Sample-Data-Viz

 

Okay, with the housekeeping complete, let’s remember our goal for linear regression: find the line of best fit. 

Let’s also tie this back to the real world. Perhaps we’re a marketing director or VP of marketing needing to convey the ideal number of marketing touchpoints to the CMO and CEO. Doing so could help guide budgeting, channel mix, and planning questions.

How do we find a line of best fit? Through linear algebra and programming, we can objectively determine the best fit by testing hypotheses and measure each hypothesis line against the actual data points for closeness of fit.

2017-04-30-004a-Univariate-Linear-Regression-Cost-Function-Hypothesis-A

Being frank, the material up to this point is pretty humdrum. However, when we start making hypotheses such as the above, things get interesting. The program “makes a guess” as to the line of best fit, perhaps like the illustration above. I’m no “eggspert”, but that doesn’t look like a great line of fit.

 

But have no fear dear reader, math/science comes to the rescue. The next portion of the algorithm calculates the distance (cost function / squared error) from the training data to the predicted line of best fit in a process called squared error function. When you plot the hypothesis against the squared error sum, you may get a distribution something like the below.

2017-04-30-005-Univariate-Linear-Regression-Cost-Function-Plot

Bare with me. Let’s say we plotted:

  1. Our illustrated hypothesis (teal plus sign)
  2. Other attempted hypotheses (tan x’s), and,
  3. The best fit hypothesis (green outlined star)

This renders a convex parabolic distribution. To get the line of best fit, we want to get as low on the X axis as possible. (Known as the global minimum.) The further magic in machine learning is how we move from a lame hypothesis (teal plus sign) to solution (green outlined star). Now, meet a technique called gradient descent. Sidebar: if we’re being more mathematical and technical about it, this really plots to a 3D conic distribution, but the above explanation should suffice for now if we’re not getting bogged down in the math.

 

Parameter Learning & Gradient Descent

Gradient descent is the iterative mathematical process of working our way down the squared error plot from a lousy hypothesis to a line of best fit. Again, we’re not delving into calculations and derivatives – there’s a TON of math that goes behind this material.

Gradient descent systematically tests increments of hypotheses against a specified learning rate. The learning rate is essentially the magnitude or speed with which you which try to move along the convex function down to zero.

2017-04-30-006-Univariate-Linear-Regression-Simplified-Gradient-Descent

 

Wrap Up

Did I mention this is one of the toughest posts for me to date? The other contender is my DIY Alexa Raspberry Pi article. It’s now 3:20 a.m. on a Saturday night/Sunday morning as I type this conclusion. (Insert horror emoji.)

So, if we were to break down all of the above into a short bulleted list:

  1. Univariate linear regression takes sample data to make a line of best fit
  2. “Best fit” is objectively measured by a squared error function, or the summed distances of the hypothesis line from the actual data points
  3. The hypothesis and squared error function plot roughly a convex parabolic graph
  4. Gradient descent is an algorithm that systematically reduces the squared error hypothesis, guided in part by the learning rate
  5. The gradient descent iteratively seeks the global minimum on the convex function, AKA the line of best fit
  6. The line of best fit is determined, (and Teh Lurd of Teh Rings finishes on your second monitor to Herb Alpert’s Spanish Flea.)

 

Next up, we’ll be installing some machine learning software (Matlab & Octave) and diving into multivariate regression. Look after each other.

DSC_0045 Zach Doty Cover Photo Group By SQL Statement Function

GROUP BY SQL Statement

Introducing the GROUP BY SQL Statement in PostgreSQL

‘Ello SQL geeks! Welcome back to our SQL learning journey. We left off with a beginner SQL skills challenge and the aggregate SQL functions: MIN, MAX, AVG and SUM. Today we’re looking at the GROUP BY statement. We’ll learn about this function in PostgreSQL and walk through usage of this handy SQL statement.

 

About the GROUP BY SQL Statement/Clause

From my simple understanding, GROUP BY functions like a hybrid of the following:

  • SELECT DISTINCT keyword (If used without an aggregate function like SUM), and,
  • An Excel pivot table, rolling up aggregate figures (Count, Sum, Average, etc.) into unique rows

If you’re familiar with Excel Pivot tables, then you’ll recognize here the power of this function.

 

Let’s take a look at some examples to clarify.

 

First Look at Using the GROUP BY Function

To better illustrate the power of GROUP BY, we’ll first show its usage without aggregate functions. Consider the following:

If we query the address table of our sample database with a generic SELECT * FROM address; we get back an atrocious 605 rows of data. Aggregate and useless!

2017-04-27-001-GROUB-BY-Generic-SELECT-Query-Pitfall

In contrast, if we call the GROUP BY function, we’ll get back a cleaner output, with fewer rows – only unique values returned. While this is an incremental improvement to analyzing data, there’s much left to be desired.

2017-04-27-002-GROUP-BY-Without-Aggregate-Function

 

What’s missing here? How about that pivot table-esque functionality? This is where the power of using GROUP BY with aggregate functions gets awesome.

Using the GROUP BY SQL Statement with Aggregate Functions

As with most analysis, a single data point or data series rarely holds significant insight value on its own. Let’s drive home that point by leveraging the GROUP BY statement with the SUM aggregate function. Below, we compare the ratings of films in our sample database in aggregate by replacement cost. Perhaps this could serve in-store strategies for loss prevention.

SELECT rating, SUM(replacement_cost)
FROM film
GROUP BY rating;

2017-04-27-003-GROUP-BY-SUM-Aggregate-Function

If we extend this functionality to more real world examples, we could use the following for GROUP BY:

  • Grouping page-level / URL data to roll up clickstream analytics data
  • Large scale analysis of CRM data for customer segmentation analysis
  • Analyzing returns for financial data

The list could (and I’m sure it does) go on.

Let’s take this one step further and reduce potential future workload, by building sort functionality into our query. Below, we add a line to get most expensive ratings to least.

SELECT rating, SUM(replacement_cost)
FROM film
GROUP BY rating
ORDER BY SUM(replacement_cost) DESC;

2017-04-27-004-GROUP-BY-SUM-ORDER-BY-SUM

By the looks of this, no need to guard Land Before Time 8. 🙂

Extending our lesson: you can use the COUNT, AVG, and other aggregate functions to analyze as desired.

 

Wrap Up

Alright, this was a relatively gentle introduction into more advanced SQL functions. GROUP BY is a rather critical function, so in our next article, we’ll be doing yet another skills challenge. Joy!

Feel free to catch up on our other articles that help you learn PostgreSQL. Also, check out some how-to’s on developing Amazon Alexa skills, and a new series on getting started with Machine Learning. As always, please share with your colleagues and share thoughts in the comments below. Cheers.

DSC_0024 Zach Doty Cover Photo for What is Machine Learning

What is Machine Learning?

Hello there, fellow Machine Learning (ML) students! Welcome back to our crash course in starting machine learning from an absolute beginner’s perspective.

In our previous article, we covered an introduction to Machine Learning, answering several key questions:

  • Where is machine learning used in our lives?
  • Where did machine learning come from?
  • Where is machine learning headed?

Forging ahead in our learning journey, we’ll introduce some definitions of machine learning and look at the major types of machine learning applications.

 

Machine Learning (ML), A Casual Definition by Arthur Samuel

Our first definition, teased in the last article, follows:

Machine learning is the practice of giving computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed to do so.

 

More on Arthur Samuel & Why His Definition on ML Matters

If you’re like me, you might not have heard of Arthur Samuel. Who is he, and why does his opinion matter in the fields of artificial intelligence and machine learning?

Arthur Samuel was a pioneer in artificial intelligence and computer gaming fields. In 1959, he coined the term “machine learning” as a founding father in the field. That’s why he’s important! Let’s also look at a more formal / scientific definition.

 

A More Formal Machine Learning Definition

Tom Mitchell, of Carnegie Mellon, offers a definition with more structure.

  • A well defined learning problem follows
  • E * T = P
    • Note: His definition does not include mathematical operators. I’m taking a large liberty to insert them myself. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Experience (E) placed against Task (T) is measured by Performance (P)

2017-04-06-001-Machine-Learning-Definition-ETP-Framework

Here’s a further example:

Example: playing Go.

E = the experience of playing many games of Go.

T = the task of playing and winning Go.

P = the probability that the program will win the next game.

 

Major Categories of Machine Learning Algorithms

If you judge by press coverage of ML as I have, it appears to be a nebulous field. (In all fairness, it may still be.) However, there is structure we can take in learning ML. There are two types of machine learning algorithms:

  • Supervised learning algorithms
  • Unsupervised learning algorithms

There are a couple of other prominent types of machine learning algorithms as well: reinforcement learning and recommender systems.

 

 Wrap-Up

Congratulations, we’ve cleared a very gentle introduction to machine learning, and it’s novice/high level definitions. I look forward to learning more with you, dear reader! Our next articles will cover a bit more detail about the two major ML algorithm types: supervised learning, and unsupervised learning. Until then, look after each other.

Exploring marketing career paths by climbing a mountain in Colorado

4 Simple Marketing Career Paths Your Professor Never Told You About

Several months ago, I sat in a warm conference room in the University of Houston Bauer business school. The wind gusted outside;  professors and a couple of brave students shuffled papers on a conference table between presentations. I was privileged to be an advisory board member and mentor at this Enactus UH event.

Unexpectedly (to me), an adjacent student leaned over and asked about marketing career paths. What an intelligent question! I realized determining a marketing career path can be utterly confusing as a student. There are slick advertising agencies, PR boutiques, massive corporations with large silos and vague job titles all around. What on earth is an account executive and what makes it different from an account planner, account manager or anything else?

In that moment, it was my pleasure to share with this student how to evaluate marketing career paths. Some years ago, I was strangely fortunate that by providence I’ve enjoyed such an easy, clear path so far in my young career. Reflecting on that exchange, there are likely thousands of students seeking clarity and guidance on marketing careers.

Below is a simple method that shows you marketing careers at a glance, with detailed explanations below.

marketing-advertising-jobs-career-starts

tldr;

In marketing, you make major two choices that determine your career path: where you work and what you do. You’ll either work at an agency or a client and you’ll either focus on branding or direct response. Obviously, there’s room for a lot of creativity and nuance – but a large portion of marketing careers fit this framework.

Where You Work: Agency

We’ll start here, because I’m most familiar with this area. An agency is a 3rd party that a brands such as Adidas or GM hires to help with marketing. Agencies exist because they provide expertise and impartiality that brands can’t get in-house.

Marketing and advertising agencies are a great starting point to master tactical execution. You’ll often be on the sharp end of the spear: pulling reports, writing copy and auditing campaigns. It’s often a fast-paced environment. The offices have bright lights, open concept floor plans, and quirky perks.

Working in an agency is fun! However, it’s imperative you do some homework before joining an agency. I’ve been very fortunate to work at agencies that offer great benefits and pay. My agency experiences have been nothing short of phenomenal. Regrettably, not all marketing agencies are that way. Some agencies  can be volatile if clients leave or have long/tough hours in uncertain conditions. That said, it’s your privilege of choice!

Where You Work: Client

If you’re not the agency, you’re likely the client. If you’re on the “client side”, you’re likely working in-house at a brand like Hilton or Neiman Marcus.

Client side marketing can vary a lot, depending on the marketing maturity of your organization. In some organizations, you may be managing agencies, vendors and strategy. In less-developed or smaller companies, marketing may be closer to sales support.

In general, client-side jobs are more stable and evenly paced than agencies. Deadlines are usually more relaxed and the pay is generally higher compared to agencies. However, marketing can be vulnerable in a corporate setting. If your organization falls on hard financial times, accounting and marketing are the first functions to be cut.

Much like agencies, there are great brands and tough situations. Do your homework!

What You Do: Branding

Now you know where you can work in marketing and advertising. The aspiring marketer’s next major decision is what you do.

In marketing, you either focus on consumer actions or consumer perceptions. The art and science of branding focuses on consumer perceptions. Branding is a fascinating discipline. You constantly fight battles in the minds of brands and consumers. You must appear first, as the best.

Branding jobs often have “creative” or “strategist” somewhere in the title; a keen sense of strategy is key to your success. To learn more about branding, you should read the classic, “Positioning” by Al Ries and Jack Trout. A caveat to branding-centric positions: you may lack experience in tactical marketing execution at the expense of creative pursuits. If you’re a strategy maven (which is rare), you can survive without concrete tactical knowledge. If you’re weak in strategy, it can be tough to advance your career in this field.

What You Do: Direct Response

The other major marketing avenue is direct response. Instead of focusing on consumer perceptions (branding), you work with consumer actions. Direct response is self-evident, you work to produce an action from a consumer. If you envision a purchase funnel, direct response typically handles the end: making a sale, strengthening a relationship.

Direct response jobs often have “analyst”, “planner” or “specialist” in the title. Working in direct response is fantastic to build practical, tactical experience that can be used in many places & many ways. You’ll find skills such as auditing, research and optimization highly marketable.

The upside of starting in direct response is that marketing is inherently self-promotional: the barriers to entry are low. However, if you don’t chase strategy skills, you can be quickly stuck as a tactician and encounter long-term difficulty advancing your career.

Finding Your Path

The good news: marketing career paths are an open playing field! The bad news: marketing career paths are an open playing field. Hopefully this post brings some definition to a broad field, while pointing out benefits and risks.